Getting Onto Annacis Island (The Annacis Island Swing Bridge)

Having introduced Annacis Island in previous posts, this time I thought it would be worth taking a  look at how trains actually get onto the island. That’s because they make use of a rather interesting road and rail bridge known as the Derwent Way or Annacis Island swing bridge.

Booms by Glen Ritchie – All rights reserved
Used with permission, View Image

The slightly cryptic image above doesn’t reveal a great deal about the bridge itself (it’s a view from the control tower of the bridge as it opens/closes for passing river traffic) but it has the potential to make a very interesting module and scratch building project…

The Annacis Island Bridge connects the community of Queensborough with the northern end of Annacis Island. The bridge carries both road traffic and the SRY rail line across the Annacis Channel of the Fraser River. Wikipedia


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Creative Commons licensed images of the bridge are quite hard to come by hence the lack of images in this post but I did stumble across a great satellite image of the bridge on the marinas.com website of all places!

I’ve also put together a gallery of Flickr images of the bridge as many of these images show details that would really assist scratch-building.
For sratchbuilding purposes the best side-on photographs of the bridge I can find are here and here .

Below is a view from the road that includes the bridge control tower which would make a very interesting model in it’s own right. The rail line is to the left of the road so trains passing over the bridge travel under the control tower itself.

Bridge In Operation by Glen Ritchie – All rights reserved
Used with permission, View Image

To help get a better idea of what happens when the bridge opens and closes you can watch a YouTube video of the swing bridge in action here.

The bridge and the banks at either side scale to about two standard length modules. The joint where the two modules meet could even be disguised by the wood sheathed pier that supports the bridge as this protrudes some distance from the bridge on both sides.

I’m looking forward to having a go at building this bridge, it might even be possible to motorize the swing mechanism and now I’m even wondering if there is a Faller type system for boats?

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